Epidural Assisted Labor

Epidural anesthesia is the injection of a numbing medicine into the space around the spinal nerves in the lower back and has become a popular form of childbirth pain relief. It numbs the area above and below the point of injection and allows you to remain awake during the delivery. It’s effective and can be used for either a vaginal birth or a cesarean delivery (C-section). Here at Ste. Genevieve County Memorial Hospital a certified registered nurse anesthetist (CRNA) administers epidural anesthesia.

How an epidural is given

Epidural anesthesia involves the insertion of a sterile guide needle and a small tube (epidural catheter) into the space between the spinal cord and outer membrane of the spinal cord (epidural space). The epidural catheter is placed at or below the waist. The CRNA first uses a local anesthetic to numb the area where the needle will be inserted. Then the guide needle is inserted and removed, while the catheter remains in place. The catheter is taped in place up the center of your back with the end taped in place on top of your shoulder.

 An anesthetic medicine is injected into the catheter to numb your body above and below the point of injection, as needed. The amount of discomfort or pain that you have depends on the amount of anesthetic used. Less anesthetic (often called a light epidural) will allow you to be more active in your labor and feel enough to push effectively. With higher levels of anesthetic, you will feel little or no pain from your contractions. You may be required to remain in bed when an epidural is used. You will also have a tube placed in a vein (intravenous, or IV tube), fetal monitoring, and blood pressure monitoring.

Before delivery, the epidural medicine dose can be decreased so that you can push more effectively while remaining alert and relatively comfortable. The epidural catheter can also be used to numb the area between the vagina and anus (perineum) just before delivery.

Because the amount of medicine given at one time is small, epidural anesthesia wears off during labor unless additional medicine is given. So the use of epidural infusion pumps has become more common. With an infusion pump, the epidural medicine is given continuously in small amounts so that you don't have to worry that the pain relief will wear off during your delivery.

In addition to more constant pain relief, another benefit of having an infusion pump is that it allows you to have more control of your belly and leg muscles. It also reduces the chance of side effects related to a standard epidural.
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